The open road beckons, not necessarily to the bold, nor to the timid, but to the wayfarer who finds the empty countryside full of wonder. The wayfaring photographer, it can be said, does not take pictures; rather the pictures take him or her. The locale does not matter. What does matter is patience, a relaxed pace and time for reflection. Looking is not the same as seeing.

What we are talking about, of course, is landscape photography for its own sake—pictures made not to illustrate an article, fill a family album or advertise a resort. The photographs presented here are for the most part the result of wandering, taking the open road and stopping anywhere and everywhere. Most were made far from national parks and other commonly photographed scenic wonders. They are offered as evidence that scenic beauty can be found almost anywhere.

90 photos
Visitors 490
Member since 28-May-11

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Address12306 Clover Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90066
United States
Daytime phone310-849-0074
Evening phone310-397-3004
Mobile phone310-849-0074
Fax number310-397-3202
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Bart Everett is a veteran newspaper journalist and photographer who has worked for the Los Angeles Times, the Kansas City Star and the International Herald Tribune in Paris. He grew up as an “airline brat,” traveling with his family—and later alone—around the world. He acquired his first camera, a Kodak Duoflex, when he was about eight years old, later borrowed his father’s Leica—which he subsequently lost in Nepal—and then moved on to Speed Graphic press cameras.

He earned his first money in photography as a high school sports photographer selling freelance work to the Kansas City Star. As a student at Kansas State University, he was a photographer for the student newspaper, the daily Collegian, where he later served as editor. When the People to People program was launched, he joined the staff and was recruited by the Carl Byoir agency to photograph and write about student ambassadors in Europe. In the U.S. Army at Ft. Sill, Oklahoma, he worked in the Public Information Office and often shot motion picture film for a television station in Lawton, Oklahoma. After leaving the Army he became editor of Grass & Grain, a mid-Kansas farm weekly, where he was also the sole photographer.

As a reporter at the Kansas City Star, he was often assigned to the Saturday night police beat. Instead of covering the beat from the police station as was customary, he roamed the city in a car equipped with police radios and a press camera, offering his editors both words and pictures.

As an editor at the Los Angeles Times, he often provided feature photographs shot on his off hours and occasionally was in a position to bring in spot news photographs, as was the case when the oil tanker Sansinena exploded in the Los Angeles Harbor.

Since the early 1970s he has worked almost exclusively with 35-millimeter film and digital cameras. After leaving the Times in 2004 he concentrated on landscapes and fine art photography. His work now is represented by 10 international stock agencies, which market digital files on the Internet.

His photography and writing has been published in newspapers and magazines as well as on the Internet. He lives in Los Angeles with his family but continues to travel widely.


All Photographs

California Coast

Visitors 45
8 photos
Created 30-May-11
Modified 30-May-11
California Coast

Eastern Sierra

Visitors 56
11 photos
Created 30-May-11
Modified 30-May-11
Eastern Sierra

Rural California

Visitors 79
6 photos
Created 28-May-11
Modified 28-May-11
Rural California

Southern California

Visitors 268
10 photos
Created 28-May-11
Modified 28-May-11
Southern California

Hinterlands

Visitors 77
19 photos
Created 28-May-11
Modified 28-May-11
Hinterlands

Hawaii

Visitors 54
10 photos
Created 30-May-11
Modified 30-May-11
Hawaii

Byways

Visitors 44
26 photos
Created 30-May-11
Modified 30-May-11
Byways
Open All Photographs